Nepal. Trek around Annapurna. Part 7. South Mustang

The beginning of the descent from the pass and immediately loss! The second sole came off the trekine boots. She bravely held out for a couple of days longer than the first, but still terribly little. Don’t buy Chinese shoes, or stock up on glue! The pass is behind, so it’s not such a terrible loss.

The descent turned out to be very long. Not even so, this is the longest drop in height in my life. I can’t even imagine starting the route from this place. Maybe two days to climb. At a discount of about 2000 m height difference.

Descend very cheerfully! Without a backpack, you could well entertain yourself with a downhill run. With a backpack, you can also, but there is a good chance to kill your knees or just screw up along the way, stumbling over a stone. Do not forget that descending from the mountain is much more dangerous than climbing. People relax and do not pay much attention to the dangers, and the body is already tired after climbing.

The descent took three hours, although it seemed that you could go down in half an hour. It was a difficult descent. Countless serpentines, turns and stones that you stumble over.

There is a large plateau at the bottom. There are many small trails and it is hard to choose the main one without using GPS with a map. Of course you can go straight, but in some places there are cracks, small ravines. Apparently, when the snow melts, there are powerful streams of water. It looks like an arid desert.

The landscape changes absolutely! After the snow, a rocky desert, on which dozens of temples and small villages are scattered. It’s as if you got to another area of the planet in just a few hours. Impressive!

There was a holiday in the village of Muktinath, under the pass. Crowds of tourists in colorful outfits walk the temples. Later I learned that even the President of India himself was there that day. An incredible number of pilgrims are drawn to this village for the holiday.

The villages themselves are similar to those that I saw in Kashmir, in Little Tibet. In the big Tibet, which is on the territory of China, fate has not yet entered, but I really want to! I think there is similar architecture, at least from the films it is.

A Norwegian traveler made up my company for this day. Interestingly, he is also a fan of walking thousands of kilometers like me. It’s great to meet such people on your way!

As you can see in the photo, there is a good road to the village of Muktinath & nbsp; It was recently laid and it is quite short, but it was still possible to relax after the rocky paths. I even threw out my boots in the village. It was very in vain, because there was a long way along the riverbed behind the road and it was very uncomfortable in sneakers!

It felt like you miraculously moved from Nepal to somewhere in Pakistan. Huge desert mountains with snow caps and local donkeys. You must definitely go there. I think I will still decide on the Great Himalayan Way!

A strong wind arose closer to the river. A couple of times I even ripped the buff off my head. I had to run to catch him across the steppes, throwing off my backpack. This is a very cheerful place to overclock. I would not like to be here in bad weather.

The road ends at the river. Several tens of kilometers ahead along the riverbed. It’s just awful in sneakers. If my legs hadn’t been so full over the past few days, I wouldn’t have walked an hour normally here. Jumping over stones, and in some places and walking into a ford, and then again over stones is a difficult test for the legs.

The difficulties do not end there. The weather began to change dramatically. A strong wind brought rainy clouds with it. At first it was drizzling a little, but it was immediately clear where everything was going. We changed clothes on the go, hid the equipment in a backpack. There was no time to take pictures, it was necessary to have time to walk to the village in order to get up for the night with the Internet. Then the rain intensified and it was necessary to pay all attention to the stones under our feet.

The snowy peaks are hidden behind the clouds. The rainy season was coming into force. This is the price for trails free from tourists. Again, we could set up camp and wait for good weather, but we decided to move on. I was already drawn to run all over Nepal on my own legs.

In the village, I was offered to wait out the bad weather for free, while I was tempted by home cooking. After hiking noodles, it was very difficult to resist. I would like to convey my gratitude to this Nepalese family for their hospitality! Together with them I started planning the race in Nepal.

At this point, you can end my story about the campaign around Annapurna. For a few more days I climbed along the river to civilization. At first, according to tradition, on foot, from village to village. With electricity, everything was bad and I could not afford to charge my phone, so I took very little pictures.

After a day of windy rains, I began to use a hitchhiker, or rather even a motor-stop. Jeeps are all packed to capacity with locals at the departure points, and I saw only two buses in a day. I was not interested in going down to such transport.

Driving a bike along a riverbed is a high skill and then I had no idea how much, because then I had not yet driven a motorcycle. Now I am scared to remember some moments when I was sitting in the back seat of a bike with a huge backpack. It is raining, knee-deep mud, somewhere you need to drive through streams, somewhere to go along a cliff and everything on slippery stones. It was something! I’ll have to try it myself somehow! And that was all, then there was Run in Nepal